The Blackall Woolscour

I love family time and it was certainly lovely to spend some with Nerida and Garth but once again we have to move on towards home, so it’s on to Blackall. Isisford to Blackall is only 124km so this was going to be a short road trip today. Outside temperatures are starting to drop as we head home, the morning lows are around 4 and tops of around 18. I am finding that the layers of clothing are starting to come back on.

The Blackall Woolscour operated from 1908 to 1978. This particular Woolscour is the only steam-driven one which incorporates a shearing board for twenty shearers. An Artesian free flowing bore is right next to the scour providing plenty of hot water for scouring. A temperature of 58 degrees was a little too warm for a bath. Blackall is situated on the Great Artesian Basin which provides this beautiful hot water to a lot of outback communities in Queensland, New South Wales and South Australia.

It was amazing to see the machinery which runs the Woolscour in action. A steam engine drives about a kilometre of drive belts running the scour components. It is all kept in perfect running order after the Woolscour was fully restored in 2002 and once again used steam to run it. We thoroughly enjoyed our tour of the Woolscour and looking around the grounds where the shearer’s quarters and outdoor cooking areas were.

A chat over lunch and the decision was made to travel a little further to Tambo, only 100kms down the road and it is home to the famous Tambo Teddies. Beautiful handmade teddies, made of pure wool and all unique, should be interesting.

Driving into Tambo we saw a herd of emus. We had seen some along the road through the day and had to stop for a couple but had missed the photo opportunity, so we took advantage of the chance to photograph them now. Alas, when we arrived in town the teddy shop had closed early on this particular Saturday, so I will have to go online and have a look at them later, when I get network coverage again.

Just out of town, towards the racecourse and on the banks of the Barcoo River once again, was our destination for the night at Stubby Bend. I am so glad we stopped here as it didn’t disappoint us. Picturesque views of the open plains, more friendly people and quiet.

 

We met a lovely s lady, Janette who was part of the HF radio club and got a message to Garth of where we were. On our walk around we also met John and Jo from Echuca who came down to our camp after dinner for a cuppa and chat. He was a real iconic, Australian stockman. His campfire tales and his country jargon gave us some laughs for the evening. Murray managed to get a fantastic shot of John and his dog Bill in the sunset.

Sunday we will be heading to Mitchell and so will John and Jo. We are hoping to take advantage of the beautiful Artesian Baths there this afternoon.

Cheers. Xo

About Leanne and Murray

Traveller, Cook, Blogger, Teacher's Aide, Swimmer, Mother, Wife and yoga lover.
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2 Responses to The Blackall Woolscour

  1. Stewart says:

    Disappointing not to be able to check out the Tambo Teddies, was also closed when we went through !

    Like

  2. John Morris says:

    The scour is way different to when we lived in Blackall, a local grazier took me thru and explained its’workings. The artesian bore and pool have been cleaned up too. I remember the winter temps with ice sitting in the gutters in the mornings, notices in the motels to inmates not to turn off taps left running so they wouldn’t freeze. Love reading about your travels, keep up the good work.

    Liked by 1 person

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